THIS WEEK ONLY: “Designing the High Line” on Sale!

sale-imageUntil this Friday, December 12, we’re selling our recent publication, Designing the High Line, for $18, a 40% discount from its regular price.  Finish (or start) your holiday shopping by ordering a copy of the book, which contains detailed renderings and descriptions of all of the final designs for Sections 1 and 2 of the High Line.

This full-color paperback book is the only place to find a comprehensive selection of the final design renderings that were unveiled in June, along with historic photographs, maps, and construction photos.  With forewords by design team members James Corner of Field Operations and Ricardo Scofidio of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, among others.

This publication makes a great gift for any High Line enthusiast on your list, especially considering the fact that another High Line-related book, photographer Joel Sternfeld’s Walking the High Line, is currently selling for $549.00 on Amazon.com. 

For a preview of some of the images you’ll find in the book, check out the design slideshow on our web site.

Stop and Smell the Roses

Friends of the High Line moved offices last month, and our new West Chelsea digs are a bit further from the subway. I’ve been using my morning and evening commute to get to know our new neighborhood.

Our new office is just west of the Chelsea Historic District [PDF], where the beautiful Greek Revival townhouses of Cushman Row encourage pedestrians to stop and smell the proverbial roses. Or in this case, the literal ones.

This photo, taken yesterday, shows the roses that are now blooming along the gates of the General Theological Seminary on 20th Street. The gothic-looking Seminary, built on land donated by Clement Clarke Moore, is a beautiful oasis of greenery, and a great place to check out if you’re in the neighborhood.

Ouroussoff on Truth-Bending Rail Yards Renderings

Yesterday, New York Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussof used Tishman Speyer’s winning rail yards bid as an example of a problematic trend in urban development. He explains that misleading renderings are designed (or censored) to prevent public objection, so projects can slip easily through the public review process. Tishman Speyer, or course, is only one example of this, but when the MTA’s announcement was made, Ouroussoff noticed,

“Basic details like the surrounding context were left incomplete; there were no elevations to show what the project would look like from the street. The largest of the models on display was cut off at mid-elevation, making it virtually impossible to understand the towers’ colossal scale.”

Now You See It, Now You Don’t (NY Times)

Close Reading: The West Side Railyards Project (Interactive Graphic)

Neil Denari’s HL23

hl-233.jpghl231.jpg

Another addition to the burgeoning architectural wonderland that is West Chelsea.

This one is HL23, designed by Neil Denari, a new residential condo building for developer Alf Naman. It’s right next door to another far-out new condo, Lindy Roy’s High Line 519. Site work on the project began a few months ago, but construction is officially beginning this month.

The 14-story building bends and folds in response to the High Line, widening as it rises. Although now based in LA, Denari used to live in the neighborhood, and first became interested in the High Line after seeing Stephen Holl’s “Bridge of Houses” proposal back in the ’80s for houses on the High Line.

It’s also raising the bar for green buildings in the area, with LEED Gold certification and 100 percent green energy use planned.

The building will also be the subject of a special exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York. It’s called “New York Fast Forward: Neil Denari Builds on the High Line,” and it’s running from June 10 to September 14. More news on that later.

hl-232.jpg

The building has also gotten a lot of press, both bloggy and papery.

Gentlemen, Start Your Spaceships: HL23 Listings Hit Web [Curbed]

HL23 – Condos at 515 West 23rd Street [Triplemint]

Eye-catching building highlights High Line rebirth [AM New York]

Neil Denari Architects, HL23 [Arcspace]

Video: Cooper Union Architect Presentations

On Monday, architects from the five development teams presented their designs to the public at Cooper Union. Videos of each presentation are now available. Please note these videos have been edited down for length, and the sound quality is not great.

Steven Holl for Extell

Robert AM Stern, Bernardo Fort Brescia, Eugene Kohn and Claire Weisz for Related

Dan Kaplan and Margie Ruddick for Durst/Vornado

James Corner and Gary Haney for Brookfield

Francisco Gonzalez Pulido for Tishman Speyer

More than 1,000 attend Cooper Union Presentations

img_2542.jpg

A standing-room only crowd packed Cooper Union’s Great Hall on Monday night to hear leading architects from the five developer teams present their visions for the Rail Yards. Each team made a 20-minute slide presentation focusing on the design of their proposal. Many were careful to mention that the designs were preliminary and that renderings were merely illustrative of design principles.

The roster of presenters was packed with big names, including Steven Holl for Extell, Robert A.M. Stern and Eugene Kohn from Related, James Corner and Gary Haney for Brookfield, and Dan Kaplen and Margie Ruddick for Durst/Vornado, among others.

After the presentations, the architects held a panel discussion, answering questions about what distinguished their plans from the others, how they treated open space, the High Line, affordable housing and retail frontage, among other topics. Videos of the five presentations and the panel discussion will be available on Rail Yards Blog soon.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.