Movable Chaise Lounge Mock-up Arrives!

[Members of the construction, design, and client teams meet to review the lounge chair mock-up.]

One of the most exciting furniture pieces on the High Line will be movable chaise lounge chairs located at the Sundeck between West 14th and 15th Streets. These lounge chairs will sit on the original rail tracks, mounted on new wooden ties, and can be rolled into place or set with brakes.

Unobstructed views of the Hudson River will make this one of the most desirable areas to visit on the High Line. 

This mock-up arrived last week and is installed near the Gansevoort end.

 

[Detail of wheel sitting on the rail track.]

More photos after the jump.

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Photo of the Week: Aerial from 15th Street

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This one was taken before construction began, in the fall of 2005. In the foreground, the High Line runs above the (soon to be gone) Chelsea Car Wash, before ducking through the former Cudahy Meatpacking plant.

Last week’s Photo of the Week

 

Photo of the Week: Rail Yards Wildlife!

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This 4-inch praying mantis was spotted on the Rail Yards section, above 30th Street.

Photo of the Week: West Side Cowboy Twofer

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[Cowboy on 10th Avenue and 17th Street. Click to enlarge.]

This is one of our favorite historical images. The West Side Cowboys were employed by the City to ride in front of street-level freight trains and wave pedestrians out of the way. This was the City’s stopgap measure to stop the carnage on what was known as “Death Avenue.” The Cowboys were phased out after the High Line was built, raising train traffic to the third story of industrial buildings. The cowboy above is from the 1930′s, when the High Line was being built, and the structure is visible in the background. The cowboy below dates from 1911, before the High Line was a glimmer in its daddy’s eye.

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[Cowboy on 13th Street and 11th Avenue in the Meatpacking District. Photo from Shorpy.com, the 100-Year-Old Photo Blog. Click to enlarge and note the guy with the pegleg.]

After the jump, the 1934 London Terrace Tatler waxes eloquent about the Cowboys and their brave ponies.

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Photo of the Week: Rainy Day Woman

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In honor of the dismal weather forecast for this week, here’s my favorite rain shot of the High Line. This is an old meatpacking platform on 13th Street turned impromptu surrealist still-life.

Previous Photo of the Week

Rail Yards, High Line, West Side Highway from Above

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[Photo (c) Alex S. MacLean/Landslides Aerial Photography. Click image to enlarge]

Historical Photo: High Line Construction Cranes

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[Courtesy Mary Habstritt. Click image to enlarge]

This 1930′s shot was taken looking West along 30th Street from around 11th Avenue, as the High Line was being built. Construction equipment can be seen mounted onto temporary rails. Cranes were built to pass over the trains in the rail yards.

 The photo was part of a construction survey done by contractors the George A. Fuller Company. The Fuller Company (which still exists) was formerly one of the largest construction companies in the world. The Company worked on the Lincoln Memorial, the National Cathedral, and the Louisiana State Capitol, among many others.

As the catalogue label shows, the High Line was referred to as the NYC Viaduct, and the architect is listed as NY Central, the rail road. Again, the Miller Elevated Highway can be seen in the background.

A historical birds-eye view is here.

1930′s Rail Yards

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A view looking Southwest at the working rail yards, taken shortly after the High Line was built (date and photographer unknown). Note the boxcars; the rail yards were originally used for freight, but are now used for Long Island Rail Road trains. The Miller Elevated Highway can also be seen, to the right.

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