Warehoused! New Historic District to Hug the High Line

 The handsomest factories and warehouses around the High Line got a kiss from the city on March 18, when the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) calendered a proposal for a new industrial historic district in West Chelsea.  When the LPC calendars a proposal, it has a high chance of being approved.  The hearing is scheduled for May 13.  Read the LPC’s statement about the district after the jump. 

Here’s a map of the district:

 west-chelsea-hd__proposed.jpg

[Click to enlarge. Courtesy NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission]

There are many people and groups who’ve helped make this happen, most notably New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who provided crucial leadership on this initiative, as she has done on so many other important projects in our neighborhood (including the High Line!).  State Senator Tom Duane also championed the effort, as did the Society of the Architecture of the City.  That said, the historic district was originally the brainchild of a longtime Chelsea resident and Community Board 4 member, Ed Kirkland.  Ed has been pushing for this historic district for years — it’s one of many ways this dedicated preservationist and tireless community activist has worked to ensure that the most valuable historic resources of our community are maintained.

We’re excited about this district, because it joins the High Line’s preservation in demonstrating the importance of preserving industrial architecture and infrastructure.  Some of the buildings in the district are among our favorites in the High Line neighborhood, including the Starrett-Lehigh Building, the New York Terminal Warehouse Company’s Central Stores, and many others.

west-chelsea-otis-elevator-building.jpg

[The Otis Elevator Building, built in 1911-1912, is one of the buildings in the proposed West Chelsea Historic District.  Photo courtesy NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission.]

Other buildings in the proposed district include: the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Freight Warehouse; the RC Williams Warehouse; the Cornell Iron Works, and the Reynolds Metal Company.

Read the LPC’s statement about the district after the jump. Continue reading

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Celebrating Women’s History With Council Speaker Christine Quinn

Chris Quinn 
[The crowd mingles and enjoys tasty treats inside the Brooklyn Museum’s Rubin Pavillion.]

On Tuesday, I attended a celebration of Women’s History Month at the Brooklyn Museum hosted by New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.  The event honored women in the arts, and I ran into a lot of Friends of the High Line’s partners and neighbors there, including some folks from the Whitney and Dance Theater Workshop.

The reception kicked off with coffee and desert in the lobby of the gorgeous Rubin Pavillion, which is a recent addition to the museum that opened to the public in 2004.  This glass-enclosed lobby and the public plaza outside it are two of my favorite spots in Brooklyn.  After the Speaker arrived, the crowd moved to the Cantor Auditorium for an awards ceremony, followed by tours of the museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. 

The Dinner Party

[Just because I love it, a shot of Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party, now housed permanently at the Sackler Center. Photo by Susan Jablon.]