Thematic Map of 14th Street and 10th Avenue


Image from Synedoche Design. Click for larger version.

A group of graduate architecture students from the University of Michigan recently created this intriguing map of surface temperatures on the High Line.

Adam Smith, also one of the creators of Synedoche Design, tells us they chose to measure the space at 14th Street and 10th Avenue because of the variety of materials in that area.  Using a laser thermometer, they measured the temperatures of  everything from concrete planks and wood benches to gravel and vegetation.  Adam explains, “the key goes from light to dark (dark being the hottest and light being the coolest).  It’s interesting to be able to see the pathways form out of these dots, and the benches that keep you warm on a sunny day in October.”

We agree!

It’s interesting, too, how similar the thematic map looks compared to the physical map of the High Line at the same area:


From the map of the High Line available on our Web site.


One Response

  1. Cool study. I wonder how the readings will change as the plantings grow and cast denser and taller shadows to cool the walkways. They should come back in 5-7 years.

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